Tag: Westport lawyers

CAN I GET DIVORCED ONLINE WITHOUT GOING TO COURT IN CONNECTICUT?

This Week’s Blog by Westport divorce lawyer Jaime S. Dursht

CAN I GET DIVORCED ONLINE WITHOUT GOING TO COURT IN CONNECTICUT?

Yes, the State of Connecticut Judicial Branch has announced that uncontested divorces will be permitted remotely, without the requirement of physical presence in court. This is significant given the current status of court closures because it means that if you have reached agreement with your spouse on the terms of your divorce, you will be able to proceed to judgment on the papers.

Are Divorce Separation Agreements Negotiated Remotely in Connecticut?

The majority of divorce settlements are negotiated remotely with the exchange of settlement correspondence followed by drafts of the divorce agreements (called Separation Agreements). If negotiation reaches impasse, there are alternate dispute resolution options that are available on a virtual basis. Proceedings that were held in conference rooms two months ago are now taking place over conference calls and virtual meeting space. Professional mediators are conducting sessions using Zoom for example, and attorneys continue to move their cases forward utilizing remote applications and tools that are no less effective from home computers.

What are the Uncontested Divorce Requirements in Connecticut?

The Judicial Branch filing system has been paperless since 2015 when it required the electronic filing of nearly all legal documents and pleadings that would otherwise have been filed in person at the courthouse clerks’ offices. To proceed with an uncontested divorce, a fully executed Separation Agreement and sworn Financial Affidavits must be e-filed with the court, and if applicable, Child Support Guidelines, an Affidavit Concerning Children, and Advisement of Rights. Until recently, the parties and counsel were required to personally appear before a judge for an uncontested hearing for approval and entry of the Separation Agreement as final orders of the court.

What is the Procedure for a Final Online Divorce in Connecticut?

The Judicial Branch has now made it possible to meet the legal requirements of an uncontested divorce online by requiring Affidavits to be filed (Affidavit in Support of Entry of Divorce Judgment, Plaintiff or Defendant) in lieu of in-person testimony, and a Request for Approval of Final Agreement Without Court Appearance.

Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC, with offices in Westport and Greenwich, concentrates in family law and divorce. Our attorneys are extremely knowledgeable and prepared to conduct remote and/or virtual negotiation and settlements as well as final online uncontested divorce.

What is an Uncontested Hearing?

What is an Uncontested Hearing?

 An Uncontested Hearing is the final step in the divorce process, after which the marriage of the parties is dissolved. An Uncontested Hearing occurs only after the parties have reached an agreement on all outstanding issues and memorialized that agreement into a written Separation Agreement and Parenting Plan (if applicable). Generally, both parties will be required to appear in Court on that date. The actual Uncontested Hearing only takes about 15 – 20 minutes.

What Documents need to be Prepared/Submitted before an Uncontested Hearing?

 Prior to an Uncontested Hearing, the parties are required to electronically submit or “e-file” certain documents and forms. In every case, their Separation Agreement and Financial Affidavits must be e-filed. If there are minor children the following documents must be e-filed: the parties’ Parenting Plan, Child Support Guidelines, and an Affidavit Concerning Children. If there is an award of alimony or child support, an Advisement of Rights re: Income Withholding must be e-filed. Finally, if the parties have elected to waive the twenty-day appeal period, a Stipulation to that effect is typically e-filed as well.

Do I have to take the Witness Stand in an Uncontested Hearing?

 If you are the Plaintiff, yes. You will be called to the witness stand, sworn under oath, and asked certain questions by your attorney and potentially the other attorney or the judge. The Defendant is typically asked fewer questions under oath, and usually remains at counsel table.

 What Questions will I be Asked?

 Both parties will be asked about the agreement: whether they read it, signed it, understand it, believe it to be fair and equitable under the circumstances, believe it to be in the best interests of the minor children (if applicable), signed it of their own free will absent coercion or duress, and would like it to be entered as a Court order? If either or both parties have agreed to waive alimony, he, she, or they will be asked if they understand that if alimony is waived, they cannot later make a claim for alimony. The Plaintiff will be asked basic background questions: when and where the parties were married, the names and birth dates of the minor children (if applicable), whether or not either party or any minor child is receiving state aid, and if the marriage of the parties has broken down irretrievably with no hope of reconciliation? The Plaintiff will then be asked about the salient points of the parties’ agreement. This exercise will generally not be repeated with the Defendant. Instead, he or she will be asked if he or she agrees with the Plaintiff’s responses.

 What Happens After the Canvas?

 After both parties have been canvassed, the Court will make certain findings: that it has jurisdiction, when and where the parties were married, the names and birth dates of the minor children (if applicable), the presumptive amount of child support pursuant to the Child Support Guidelines and whether or not the application of the Guidelines is appropriate under the circumstances (if applicable), that the Parenting Plan is in the best interests of the minor children (if applicable), and that the parties’ agreement is fair and equitable. After it has made its findings, the Court will order the marriage of the parties dissolved and the maiden or prior name of the wife restored if she so desires.

 Is my Divorce Final that Day?

Yes, provided the parties have agreed to waive the twenty-day appeal period.

Can I have my Maiden Name Restored?

 Yes. As part of an Uncontested Hearing, you may request that the Court restore your maiden or prior name. While the restoration of that name is a valid Court Order, there is still follow-up work to be done such as going to the DMV or Social Security Office.

 Are there any Final Documents that I need?

Yes. You should keep copies of all of the Uncontested Documents in a safe place. It is also advisable to obtain Certified Copies of your Judgment File and Certificate of Dissolution of Marriage. You may need these documents to prove that you are divorced or to complete the process of restoring your prior name. At Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC, we will prepare and send to you a packet of all Uncontested Documents.

At Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC, we have extensive experience in settling cases and attending Uncontested Hearings throughout Connecticut, including Stamford, Bridgeport, Danbury, and New Haven. Uncontested Hearings may seem intimidating, but our skilled and compassionate attorneys will ensure that you are adequately prepared to bring your case to a conclusion.

This Week’s Blog by Nicole M. DiGiose.

What Happens at a Preargument Conference in a Connecticut Family Law Appeal?

This Week’s Blog by Sarah E. Murray.

What is a Preargument Conference?

In most appeals of civil cases in Connecticut, including family law and divorce cases, a Preargument Conference is required prior to the appeal progressing to the briefing and oral argument stages. The Preargument Conference is a confidential settlement opportunity that takes place with an experienced judge who will meet with counsel for both parties and attempt to help the parties reach a settlement in lieu of continuing with the appeal. Because an appeal can be a long, expensive process that usually follows an already extensive period of litigation, the Preargument Conference is an opportunity to avoid continuing litigation in favor of the finality of a settlement.

The Preargument Conference can also provide an opportunity to narrow the issues presented for appeal if the case cannot be globally settled. In discussing the pending appellate issues with the judge at the Preargument Conference, he or she can provide helpful insight into the likelihood of success on appeal. If it is appropriate for the case to be transferred to the Connecticut Supreme Court, the Preargument Conference judge has the authority to recommend that as well.

When is the Preargument Conference Scheduled?

In most family law cases, the Appellate Court will schedule the case for a Preargument Conference prior to briefs being due; so, if the case settles, the conference avoids the parties having to incur significant legal fees for the research and drafting of the brief. Within a few months of an appeal being filed, counsel for the parties will typically receive a notice or letter notifying them of the assigned time and place for the Preargument Conference.

Where does a Preargument Conference Take Place?

The Preargument Conference usually takes place at a different courthouse from the courthouse where your case was tried. On the day of the Preargument Conference, the assigned judge meets with counsel in chambers. It is rare, though not unheard of, for the judge to meet with the parties.

Do I Have to Attend the Preargument Conference?

The short answer to this question is: Yes. According to Connecticut Practice Book Section 63-10, which governs Preargument Conferences: “Unless other arrangements have been approved in advance by the conference judge, parties shall be present at the conference site and available for consultation.” The primary reason that parties must be present for Preargument Conferences is so that they can actively participate in any settlement negotiations and authorize their counsel to enter into a settlement of the case. If a case settles during a Preargument Conference, the Preargument Conference judge has the authority to enter an agreement into the record that day, and the parties must be present in Court in such an event.

Who Attends the Preargument Conference?

Parties and their appellate counsel must attend the Preargument Conference as a rule (see above). At Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC, we find it is useful for trial counsel, if different from appellate counsel, to attend as well, as he or she can sometimes provide helpful input regarding the case and potential avenues for settlement. If there are any other professionals or advisors, financial or otherwise, who can aid in settling the case, it may be helpful for them to attend or be available by telephone to discuss any settlement offers.

What Should I Do to Prepare for a Preargument Conference?

It is helpful to meet or speak with your trial and appellate counsel prior to a Preargument Conference to discuss any settlement offer that you authorize to be made at or before the conference, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of both sides’ cases. If you are the appellant (i.e., the person taking the appeal), you should decide before the Preargument Conference what, if any, settlement you would consider in order to withdraw your appeal. As with any settlement negotiation, you should determine your “best case” scenario as well as your bottom line.

If you are the appellee (i.e., the person defending against the appeal), you may question why, as the person who is not appealing the final judgment in your case, you should consider settling. There are many reasons why an appellee could or should consider settling the case, such as: 1) having the finality of a settled judgment; 2) avoiding the time, expense, and uncertainty of further litigation; and 3) avoiding a reversal of the judgment in your case if that is a real possibility. The appellee should consider in advance of a Preargument Conference any concessions he or she would be willing to make in order for the appeal to be withdrawn.

What Happens to the Appeal if the Case is Settled at the Preargument Conference?

Any global settlement at the Preargument Conference should include a statement that the appeal will be withdrawn with prejudice upon acceptance of the settlement agreement by the trial court.

What Happens after the Preargument Conference if the Case Does Not Settle?

Even if you do not settle the case at the Preargument Conference, your case can still be settled at any time before the appeal is decided by the Appellate Court. If the case is not settled that the Preargument Conference, the appellant must begin preparation of his or her brief, as the deadline for submission usually falls within approximately 45 days of the Preargument Conference. The Preargument Conference judge does have the authority to extend the time for the filing of the appellant’s brief in the event that the appellate counsel needs more time or in the event that the parties request additional time to attempt to settle the case.

Broder and Orland LLC provides appellate representation in addition to litigating family and divorce cases at the trial court level. If you are contemplating an appeal, contact Sarah E. Murray, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Center for Family Law Appeals.

What Provisions Should Be Included in a Parenting Plan?

This Week’s Blog by Nicole M. DiGiose.

What is a Parenting Plan?

A Parenting Plan is a document, usually in the form of an agreement, that addresses child-related issues, such as legal custody and a parental access schedule. In the absence of an agreed-upon Parenting Plan, a Court will determine a Parenting Plan that it believes is in the child(ren)’s best interests.

 When does a Parenting Plan need to be Submitted to the Court?

 A proposed Parenting Plan must be submitted to the Court on or before the Case Management Date, which is approximately ninety days after filing an action for dissolution of marriage. If parenting issues are disputed at the time of the Case Management Date, the parties are required to appear in Court and may be ordered to meet with a Family Relations counselor.

 What is Legal Custody?

Legal custody is the power to make decisions for a minor child(ren). Such decisions include the child(ren)’s health, education, religion, and welfare. Legal custody may be shared jointly, awarded to one parent only after good faith consultation with the other parent, or awarded solely to one parent without good faith consultation. A Parenting Plan must set forth how legal custody is shared and typically includes a definition of legal custody.

What is a Parenting Coordinator?

A Parenting Coordinator, or “P.C.,” is an individual who may be engaged by parents to help them communicate better, make decisions on behalf of their child(ren), and resolve disputes. P.C.s are generally mental health professionals or social workers. P.C.s are not judges and cannot make binding decisions—they can, however, make recommendations. Often, parents will elect to include a provision about a P.C. in their Parenting Plan. These provisions typically require both parents to meet with a P.C. in an attempt to resolve any parenting dispute before submitting the matter to a Court.

 What is a Regular Parental Access Schedule?

A regular parental access schedule sets forth when each parent will parent the child(ren) during non-holiday and vacation time. It is the day-to-day schedule. A regular parental access schedule is not “one size fits all” and will vary from family to family.

 What is a Holiday and Vacation Schedule?

 A holiday and vacation schedule sets forth all holidays that are celebrated by a family and delineates how they are shared. Parents often elect to alternate holidays such that one parent has parenting time in even-numbered years and the other parent has parenting time in odd-numbered years. Parents may also elect to assign a specific holiday to one parent in every year. A holiday and vacation schedule also addresses summer vacation. Parents will typically select a number of weeks, consecutive or non-consecutive, that each parent will have during the summer.

 What Other Provisions Should be Included?

 Parenting Plans almost always contain non-disparagement language. They should also address notice provisions with respect to travel, as well as provisions related to the attendance of medical appointments, school conferences, extracurricular activities, and the introduction of new significant others.

 What is a Right of First Refusal?

Some parents elect to include a Right of First Refusal in their Parenting Plan. If a parent is unavailable to parent the child(ren) for a certain number of hours on his or her parenting time, he or she must give the other parent the option of parenting the child(ren) before he or she engages a childcare provider. If the non-scheduled parent is also unavailable, then the scheduled parent is typically responsible for the cost of any necessary childcare. The number of hours will vary from family to family. Four to six waking hours are common.

 What if my Spouse has issues with Drugs or Alcohol?

 Drug and alcohol testing may be included in a Parenting Plan. If one or both parents are struggling with substance abuse, he or she may be required to submit to drug or alcohol testing. A testing protocol, including the frequency of tests, will be delineated in the Parenting Plan. Said protocol will also include consequences in the case of a missed or positive test. If the parent struggling with substance abuse issues is able to achieve a certain level of sobriety, his or her parenting time may be expanded upon his or her reaching certain milestones.

Can Parenting Plans be Modified?

 Yes. Parenting Plans may be modified if there has been a material change of circumstances which alters a Court’s finding of the best interests of the child(ren) or a finding that the original order sought to be modified was not based upon the best interests of the child(ren).

At Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC, we understand the sensitive nature of parenting issues in a divorce or custody dispute in Connecticut. Our skilled attorneys will guide you through the process of crafting a Parenting Plan that is consistent with your minor child(ren)’s best interests.

“Double Dipping” Considerations in a Divorce When a Business Interest is at Issue

In some divorce cases, a business (or an interest in a business) that is owned by one spouse, and from which he or she receives income, also constitutes an asset to which a value must be ascribed so that the asset can be distributed between the parties in some manner as part of an overall division of property. In instances where both the value of a business interest must be divided, and an award of alimony in favor of the non-titled spouse might also be appropriate, the concept of “double dipping” must be carefully considered in order to avoid potential inequities that could otherwise result when resolving the two separate, but sometimes interrelated issues, of property distribution and spousal support.

What is Double Dipping Generally

Generally speaking, the concept of “double-dipping” refers to a situation in which one spouse is unfairly paid twice for a single asset; once in the context of property division and a second time as part of a spousal support award.

How Can Double Dipping Occur when a Business Interest is Being Divided?

When the value of a business interest must be divided in a divorce, there are a variety of valuation methodologies that can be employed to determine the value of the interest for property distribution purposes. While an exploration into the various valuation methodologies is beyond the scope of this article, one common valuation approach that is employed in the divorce context (and stated in very simplistic terms) is for the value of the business interest to be calculated as a function of the entity’s future stream of expected income.   It is in this context that “double-dipping” issues are most likely to arise.

Specifically, double dipping concerns can arise if the same cash flows that are used to determine the overall value of a spouse’s business interest are also considered a component of that spouse’s income for purposes of calculating spousal support. Stated differently, when a business is valued based upon the entity’s expected income stream, it would constitute double dipping to both distribute the value of the business and then also base spousal support on the full amount of income the business produces.

How Can Double Dipping be Avoided

While there is a variety of ways to address double dipping concerns that may arise when a business interest is being valued and divided, one common methodology is for a “reasonable compensation” or “replacement compensation,” figure to be attributed to the business owning spouse. This figure represents the hypothetical amount that the business would pay to an unrelated person to perform the same function as the business owning spouse. Then, in determining what amount of income earned by that spouse is available for spousal support purposes, only the “reasonable compensation” amount utilized, which would necessarily be some amount less than the business owning spouse’s total earnings. Relatedly, in determining a value for the business interest, the “reasonable compensation” amount is subtracted out from the business cash flows that are used to determine the overall value of a spouse’s business interest. As a result of this process (commonly referred to as “normalizing income”), the higher the reasonable compensation figure attributed to the business-owning spouse is, the lower the value of the business will be for distribution purposes and, conversely, the lower the reasonable compensation figure attributed to the business-owning spouse is, the higher the value of the business will be for distribution purposes.

Are Forensic Experts Utilized Where Double Dipping Issues Might Arise

Yes. In cases where business valuation and/or potential double dipping issues arise, it is crucial to involve a business valuation expert with expertise in these areas. Such experts can assist clients and attorneys in wading through and understanding these often complex and thorny issues.

Cases involving distribution of business interests and double dipping concerns are often complex and, in order to be handled properly, require a great deal of expertise and attention. At Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC, we have extensive experience handling matters involving these issues and are poised to help clients achieve favorable and fair results when these issues arise.

Testifying in a Connecticut Divorce

This Week’s Blog by Christopher J. DeMattie.

Do I have to testify during my Connecticut Divorce?

A divorce action is a civil lawsuit, so any time evidence is required to resolve a disputed issued testimony of witness is likely required.  Typically, the witnesses in a divorce action are you and your spouse, however, it is common for other fact or expert witnesses to also testify.  An example of a disputed issue which could require your testimony is what school your child should attend.  You and your spouse will likely be required to provide testimony as to why you believe a certain school is a better fit for your child and why it is in your child’s best interest to attend that school.

What is the format of testifying during my Connecticut divorce?

The two main categories of testimony are direct examination and cross examination.

Direct examination is the questioning of a witness by the party that called the witness to testify.  An example of direct examination is when your attorney calls you as a witness to testify.  Proper direct examination questions are posed in an open-ended manner.  Typically, direct examination questions begin with: who, what, when, where, why, and how.

Once your attorney concludes your direct examination, your spouse’s attorney has the option to cross-exam you.  Unlike direct examination, where the questions are open-ended, proper cross examination questions are leading.  A question is considered leading if the answer is suggested in the question.  If done properly, during cross examination the attorney is essentially testifying, and the witnesses is merely confirming or denying the question posed by the attorney.

An example of a direct examination question versus a cross examination questions is as follows:

Direct – Where did you and your spouse marry?

Cross – Isn’t it true that you and your spouse were married in Greenwich, Connecticut?

Once your spouse’s attorney concludes his or her cross examination of you, your attorney will have the option to redirect you.  Redirect is the opportunity to correct or expand on the topics covered during cross examination.  Since proper cross examination often requires are simple yes or no answer, you may want the opportunity to offer more expansive testimony on the topic.  For example, on cross examination you may be asked: Isn’t it true that you were late in paying alimony, yes or no?  If the answer is “Yes”, on redirect examination your attorney may ask you: Why were you late paying alimony? You will then explain the reason why you were late paying alimony.

Thereafter, the opposing attorney will have the option to recross examine you, but he or she can only ask questions within the scope of the redirect examination.  For example, if the redirect examination is limited to questions pertaining to alimony, you typically cannot be asked questions about custody on redirect examination.  This format of redirect and recross examination will continue back and forth until there are no further questions.

What are my basic responsibilities while testifying?

Your first and most important responsibility is to tell the truth.  You will be given an oath by the Clerk to tell the truth, and failure to tell the truth could result in perjury charges or the Judge not finding you to be credible.  In a divorce case, credibility is one of the most important aspects since often a dispute comes down to a “he said, she said” situation.

Second, you need to only answer the question that is asked.  Otherwise, you answer could be stricken as non-responsive, which will only prolong the process.  You may find yourself not wanting to answer the question posed to you by opposing counsel, but you have an obligation to answer the question, unless an objection to the question is sustained.  You also need to remember that your attorney will be able to ask you follow up questions on redirect examination to correct or expand on the question.

Third, if an objection is raised, do not answer the question until you receive instructions from the Judge.  If the Judge sustains the objection you do not have to answer the question.  If the Judge overrules the objection you must answer the question.

Finally, you do not want to fight with opposing counsel.  Opposing counsel may purposefully ask incendiary questions to get you to lose your composure in front of the Judge.  You must do you best to try and stay in control and have faith in your attorney to “fix” any issues on redirect examination.

Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC with offices in Westport and Greenwich, CT, concentrates specifically in the areas of family law, matrimonial law and divorce. In addition to being highly experienced lawyers with proven results, our hallmark is the attention we give to each of our clients. Additionally, whether a case requires aggressive litigation or a mediated solution, we always exhibit an abiding compassion for the people we represent and their families, recognizing that our mission is to assist them through a very difficult, life changing event.

What Orders Are in Effect While a Connecticut Divorce Case is on Appeal?

This Week’s Blog by Sarah E. Murray.

Do the Trial Court’s Orders Take Effect Immediately Following a Divorce Trial?

Once an appeal is filed, the order(s) associated with the final judgment may be automatically stayed.  This means that until the appeal is finally concluded, the trial court cannot enforce the order(s) that are the subject of the appeal.  Generally speaking, orders regarding the division of assets and liabilities are stayed while a family law appeal is pending.  A common example of the automatic stay in practice in family cases occurs where the trial court orders that the marital home be sold.  Pursuant to the automatic stay rule, that order would not be enforced during the pendency of the appeal without the trial court terminating the stay of execution of that order, as discussed herein.

There are certain exceptions to the automatic stay rule that are permitted by the Practice Book in family cases.  For example, final orders concerning periodic alimony, child support, custody, and visitation are not automatically stayed pending an appeal.  If you are unhappy with the trial court’s alimony orders, those orders will go into effect during the pendency of your appeal unless you ask the court to impose a stay where there is not one automatically imposed by the court rules.

Is There Anything I Can Do to Have Divorce Orders that are Stayed Pending Appeal Take Immediate Effect?

Under Connecticut rules, the trial court can terminate the automatic stay of its orders on its own volition or after a motion is filed by either party.  A Motion to Terminate Stay is filed in the Appellate Court, but is decided by the trial court judge who decided the divorce case following a hearing.  In deciding a Motion to Terminate Stay, a trial court must consider the following factors: 1) the needs and interests of the parties and their children (and any other third parties affected by the orders); 2) the potential prejudice to either party, the children, or a third party affected by the orders if a stay is or is not imposed or if a stay is terminated; 3) the need to preserve the mosaic of the trial court’s orders; 4) the rights of the party taking the appeal to obtain effective relief in the event that his or her appeal is successful; 5) the effect of the Automatic Orders on any of the other factors; and 6) any other factors affecting the equities of the parties.  At the hearing on a Motion to Terminate Stay, both parties can present legal argument, and sometimes testimony, regarding whether the automatic stay should be terminated.

Can I Request that Orders that Go into Immediate Effect be Stayed While the Appeal is Pending?

It is also possible to file a Motion to impose a discretionary stay on any orders that go into immediate effect while an appeal is pending.  Such a Motion is filed in the trial court, unlike a Motion to Terminate Stay.  The trial court judge must consider the same factors recited above in deciding whether to impose a stay of the court’s orders or not.

What is My Remedy if I Do Not Agree with the Trial Court’s Decision Regarding a Request for Stay or to Terminate Stay?

The trial court is not necessarily the final arbiter of determining whether there should or should not be a stay of execution of its order.  A party aggrieved by orders regarding the termination of a stay can seek review of those orders by filing a Motion for Review with the Appellate Court.  The Appellate Court has the same power to review the issuance of a stay as it does the termination of one.

Broder and Orland LLC provides appellate representation in addition to litigating at the trial court level.  If you are contemplating an appeal, contact Sarah E. Murray, Esq., Chair of the firm’s Center for Family Law Appeals.

What is Short Calendar?

This Week’s Blog by Nicole M. DiGiose.

 

The Short Calendar is a mechanism for pending motions to be heard.  Once a motion has been filed in a case, it will appear on the Short Calendar.  Short Calendar occurs on a specific day each week, which will depend on the Judicial District in which your case has been filed, for example, Mondays in Stamford and Thursdays in Bridgeport.

 How Long does it Take for a Motion to Appear on the Short Calendar?

 Once a motion has been filed, it takes approximately two to three weeks to appear on the Short Calendar.

I Would like to Proceed with my Motion on Short Calendar – What Happens Next?

 The Short Calendar list becomes available approximately one to two weeks prior to the actual Short Calendar date.  Once the Short Calendar List becomes available, there is a period of time during which the available motions to be heard can be marked either “ready” or “off.”  In order to proceed with a motion at the Short Calendar, it must be marked “ready” during the marking period.  Once a motion has been marked “ready,” notice must then be sent to the other side.

 I am Unavailable or Unable to Proceed with my Motion on Short Calendar – What Happens Next?

 If you are unavailable or unable to proceed with your motion when it appears on the Short Calendar list, do not worry—motions may be reclaimed.  Reclaiming a motion will bring it back up to the next available Short Calendar.  Typically, motions may be reclaimed for a period of ninety days from their original file date before they are considered stale.

 What Happens at Short Calendar?

 When you first arrive at Short Calendar, your attorney will fill out a Memo to the Clerk.  This Memo indicates the status of the matter, such as: (a) whether you are requesting a continuance, (b) whether you have an agreement, or (c) whether you will need to proceed with a hearing.  Short Calendar days are usually the busiest days in the Courthouse and there will likely be some downtime while you are waiting to attend Family Relations or to have a hearing.

What is Family Relations?

 Family Relations is a free service offered by the Judicial Branch to assist the Court and parties in resolving disputes.  Prior to a contested matter being heard, the Judge will order counsel and the parties to attend Family Relations in order to attempt to resolve the dispute.  Meeting with Family Relations is generally mandatory.

 What Happens if Family Relations is Unsuccessful?

 Absent an agreement at Family Relations or otherwise, a Judge will need to conduct a full evidentiary hearing, after which he or she will render a decision, which could take up to one hundred and twenty days.

Will my Motion be Reached at Short Calendar?  What Happens if it is not Reached?

Short Calendar is reserved for “short” matters, typically those that will take about an hour or less.  If your matter is expected to take more than one hour, a judge will likely request that a date certain is obtained.  A date certain is a non-Short Calendar day on which the motion will be heard.

At Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC, we attend Short Calendar throughout Connecticut, including Stamford, Bridgeport, Danbury, New Haven, and Hartford.  Our skilled attorneys will ensure that you are adequately prepared for when your motion appears on the Short Calendar.

What are the Top Five Mistakes to Avoid in a Connecticut Divorce?

This Week’s Blog by Jaime S. Dursht

Avoid These 5 Mistakes in a Connecticut Divorce?

The divorce process is fraught with emotion which can lead to making mistakes with long-term effects.  Each divorce is different, however, here are some common mistakes we divorce attorneys see.

Is it a Disadvantage not to Understand Your Financial Situation?

Yes.  It is important at the outset of the divorce process to have an understanding of your personal and household expenses, liabilities, income and what assets there are to divide.  This will help in setting reasonable expectations as to the outcome and will help in planning for financial security moving forward, which is the ultimate goal.  Take the time to gather information, review your bank and credit card statements, and if you are not financially literate, take steps to educate yourself with the basics.

Is it Better to Settle Early in the Process?

Not necessarily.   Divorce is a highly emotional time, and it is easy to become overwhelmed by acrimony and the desire to give in just to end the emotional trauma.  This could be a costly mistake, however, because depending on the assets involved, it may be well worth taking the time to discover and fully vet out the values of business interests, trusts, stock options and pension benefits which you may be entitled to share.

Is it Worth Arguing the Details?

Often the expense of the argument can exceed the value of what it is you are trying to achieve in the first place.  Try not to get caught up in minor wins and losses of the negotiation process when it comes to the smaller details of, for instance, the method of payment of co-pays at the pediatrician’s office or the percentage point split of reimbursement for extracurricular activities.   It may feel like an emotional triumph in the short term, but may not be worth the expense in the overall cost of the divorce.

Should I Seek the Advice of Family and Friends?

It is not a good idea to rely on the advice of family and friends regarding your own divorce however well-meaning it is intended to be.  Just because your friend got the house and lump sum alimony in her divorce does not mean that you will or even should.  Every divorce is different, and one person’s experience does not readily translate into another’s.

Is it Better to Act First and Ask Later?

No.  It is always better to check with your attorney before taking action, especially if you are in an angry or depressed frame of mind.  Acting on impulse, for example cutting your spouse off from credit card use or denying access to marital funds to limit spending, can have adverse legal consequences.  Not only do these particular actions risk a contempt finding by a court, but may end up costing you more just to rectify it in the end.

The attorneys at Broder Orland Murray & DeMattie LLC with offices in Westport and Greenwich, practice solely in matrimonial and family law, and have significant experience in counseling and developing an appropriate strategy to optimize the desired financial result.